Corporate Sponsorship

We would like to expand our fundraising and communications team to include someone who can focus on gaining support from corporate sponsors. The role will involve identifying organisations likely to be sympathetic to our work and persuading them to support us. Corporate sponsorship is a new area of fundraising for Bees Abroad and one we think has potential to become a significant part of our income.

You will be joining an enthusiastic group of volunteers committed to the success of Bees Abroad. Many of us are beekeepers but it is not a requirement.

Interested? Please email our chairman richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk or phone 01799 218023 to find out more.

Trade Show Manager

 

We would like a show manager to understudy our existing volunteer. We aim to attend ten shows around the country each year to recruit supporters, fundraise and promote Bees Abroad. Shows include the BBKA Annual Convention, the National Honey Show, the Great Yorkshire Show and the South of England Show.

The role of the manager is to:

  • ensure we have volunteers to man our stand
  • manage resources used at shows
  • collect and bank funds
  • liaise with show organisers

You will be joining an enthusiastic group of volunteers committed to the success of Bees Abroad. Many of us are beekeepers but it is not a requirement.

Please email our chairman richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk or phone 01799 218023 to find out more.

Become a Trustee

We are searching for new trustees to strengthen our board and help implement the changes essential to secure our future and implement our strategy.

Our mission is the relief of poverty through beekeeping in any part of the world. Our vision is to be be the Go-To International Leader in building sustainable beekeeping enterprises for those in poverty.

Our team of volunteer beekeepers and local trainers work with selcted groups to establish social entreprises based on beekeeping. The sale of honey typically increases income by 20% and improved pollination increases crop yields.

We are interested in hearing from you whatever your background and expertise.

We don’t specify a time commitment, the more the better! Trustees meet by teleconference on the fourth Monday evening of every month. Our AGM takes place on a Sunday 8th April 2018 at Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire.

The role is entirely voluntary, no remuneration is offered. Trustees have and must accept ultimate responsibility for directing the affairs of the charity, ensuring it is solvent, well run, and delivering the relief of poverty through beekeeping. New trustees without prior experience will be expected to attend a short course on charity trusteeship.

To find out more from visit our website www.beesabroad.org.uk. and read our annual report. To learn more about the role of trustees visit the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-essential-trustee-what-you-need-to-know-cc3

Applicants should submit a brief CV and describe how they might best contribute to our future. You are welcome to contact our chairman before applying, richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk. tel: 01799 218023

It is not a requirement to be a beekeeper but commitment to and enthusiasm for our work are essential.

Volunteer with Us

We are searching for new trustees to strengthen our Board and help implement the changes essential to secure our future and implement or strategy.

Our mission is the relief of poverty through the craft of beekeeping in any part of the world. Our vision is to be be the Go-To International Leader in building sustainable beekeeping enterprises for those in poverty.

Our team of volunteer beekeepers and local trainers work with selcted groups to establish social entreprises based on beekeeping. The sale of honey typically increases income by 20% and improved poliination increases crop yields.

We are interested in hearing from you whatever your background and expertise.

We don’t specify a time commitment, the more the better! Trustees meet by teleconference on the fourth Monday evening of every month. Our AGM takes place on a Sunday in April at Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire.

The role is entirely voluntary, no remuneration is offered. Trustees have and must accept ultimate responsibility for directing the affairs of the charity, ensuring it is solvent, well run, and delivering the relief of poverty through beekeeping. New trustees without prior experience will be expected to attend a short course on charity trusteeship.

To learn more about the role of a trustee visit the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-essential-trustee-what-you-need-to-know-cc3

Applicants should submit a brief CV and describe how they might best contribute to our future. You are welcome to contact our chairman before applying, richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk 01799 218023

It is not a requirement to be a beekeeper but commitment to and enthusiasm for our work are essential.

 

Rory’s Well – Bee Farming

We are delighted to announce that we have launched a project in partnerhsip with Rory’s Well to support Bee Farming in the Barri Chiefdom, Pujehun District, SW Sierra Leone.

Neil Brent a member of Gloucestershire Beekeepers and Kath Hayward visited Sierra Leone earlier this year in order to assess potential for bee farming in the area. Five villages were visited: Korigboma, Mano, Makka, Semabu, and Taninahun meeting with the chief and meet villagers who wanted to farm bees and discuss the project with them. From the start it was clear that there was a lot of interest in all the villages. These visits also involved walking to places where there were known to be wild bees. The individuals who came forward were mostly ‘honey-hunters’ who find wild bees and then take their honey; in the process this can mean that colonies are destroyed. Bee Farming aims to maintain hives of bees for longer periods. Whilst these site visits were happening a carpenter and two local apprentices were busy making seven hives for siting close to each of the five villages.

Brian Durk will support Neil as he learns more about beekeeping in Africa and will help Neil to deliver training in this remote and challenging part of Africa.

http://www.roryswell.org/bee-farming.html

Good to the last drop – Bees in India

Martin Kunz has recently visited India. Here is a fascinating article about beekeeping there, the different species of bee and how the honey crop is improving livelihoods. The article is written by his wife Marianne Landzettel, with photos taken by Martin.

<b>Reprint courtesy of Oregon Tilth’s </b><b><i>In Good Tilth</i></b><b> magazine, Spring Issue 2017</b>

<a href=”https://igt.tilth.org/good-to-the-last-drop/”>https://igt.tilth.org/good-to-the-last-drop/</a>

United Nations funds beekeeping in Nigeria

 

The United Nations Staff 1% Development Fund has awarded a grant to a new beekeeping training centre at Zamfarawa in NW Nigeria. The UN 1% fund identifies community projects in developing countries with potential to become self-sustaining and keeps in touch with local contacts who supervise and monitor the development initiatives.

https://www.katebackdrop.comThe new Beekeeping Extension Resource Centre will be an education centre for rural communities, school children, and students of Ahmadu Bello University and the Samaru College of Agriculture. There will be a range of literature and other information on beekeeping available, examples of hives, protective clothing and extraction equipment, and a projector and screen for presentations. 120 local community members, 60% of whom are women, have already registered their interest.

The Beekeeping Extension Society (BES) have managed and run a number of projects funded and supported by BeesAbroad. The existing capacity of the group, and the involvement of Idris Muhammad Barua, BES’ Project Director (and previous BeesAbroad trainer for projects in Cameroon and Liberia) was pivotal to securing UN funding as it proved that the funds would have long-term, sustainable outcomes.

BeesAbroad are very proud that our current and previous projects have contributed to this exciting step forward for beekeeping education for Nigeria.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit to Rwanda 2017

We visited 2 community groups in the west of Rwanda to assess projects for future support from Bees Abroad. Both have in the past received funding from other organisations to establish beekeeping however no on-the-ground training was offered.

During our short visit we found that despite both being dynamic and committed community groups the lack of training has meant that neither have been successful in developing beekeeping. This is even more disappointing given that the area has a strong beekeeping tradition and newly established beekeeping groups would certainly benefit from local beekeepers willing to share their knowledge and from non-beekeepers who know the value of beekeeping and are keen to be involved.

During our week-long visit we provided basic training and support to try and enable the communities to make the most of the equipment and local knowledge that they already have. We also identified a future Bees Abroad project to provide further training in beekeeping, harvesting and marketing and believe that sharing these skills would allow both communities  to benefit as much as possible from beekeeping.

Bumba

The community in Bumba is still recovering from the genocide of 1994 to 1997 with many damaged people and families struggling to move forward in life. The Community Education Programme (CEP) sees its role to develop more projects, to improve local people’s lives and to prepare them for the 21st century.

Our contact was Father Patrick, a very enthusiastic and committed advisor to the CEP. He was previously parish priest in Bumba and has continued his involvement, working to source funding, develop new ideas and keep the community inspired. He is rightly proud of the CEP; a cooperative with a clear constitution and decisions making process whereby the management committee and cooperative members determine how to spend money, what projects to pursue and who gets paid what proportion of proceeds.

The CEP has a bakery with modern European bread oven producing bread and cakes daily. There is also a community nursery school, meeting rooms from which it runs classes, and accommodation for volunteers and/or paying guests.

There is great potential for the CEP’s beekeeping activities however this has not been successfully developed. The CEP secured funding from the German embassy to buy 70 Kenyan Top-Bar hives, 2 bee suits and a smoker but they were not confident in their knowledge and hence when we arrived all 70 hives were still in storage, waiting to be prepared and installed in apiaries.

During our visit we:

  • cut and modified the hives as not all the roofs and top bars fitted properly and taught the team to do this work so that they are now confident with the KTBs.
  • provided classroom training in bee biology, hive management and apiary management.
  • provided practical training in cleaning, baiting, checking and managing local and KTB hives.
  • thought the group how to make Catcher hives and discussed their use.
  • helped the bee keeping group set up 3 apiaries with well-located stands and hives.
  • visited a potential site for a 4th apiary and met the farmer who rents the land from CEP and who is keen to be part of the project.
  • developed good relationships with number of skilled local beekeepers, in particular Martin Ungarare who is competent to repair and modify damaged hives, clean and bait hives and assemble hives into an apiary. He is prepared to routinely check hives and to work with others to develop their skills.

There is considerable beekeeping in the local area, mostly cylindrical local hives but also a few Kenyan Top-Bar hives. Father Patrick was once again our contact: he moved to Ngororera last year and has organised for the Catholic church to support the Ngororera Womens’ group, a co-operative in which about 40 women are involved.

Some of the women have beekeeping experience and the co-operative’s President, an elected member of the local council, has worked hard to organise the use of council land for the main apiary.

The US embassy funded 60 hives however once again no beekeeping training was offered. This has meant that only one of 60 hives has bees.  We found that none of the hives in the main apiary (40 hives) had been set up correctly nor baited, some were not clean and most did not have a full set of bars.

During our visit we:

  • worked to help develop a beekeeping group (6 women, 5 men). Some of the group have bee keeping knowledge and have traditional hives. They will be of great help to the group
  • provided practical training was provided at the main apiary with the group in how to set up a hive correctly and how to clean and bait. At the end of the session 10 hives were in good working order
  • discussed basic bee biology and harvesting.
  • helped plan the development of the apiaries and agreed that 10 hives will be moved from the main apiary to one of the smaller sites, after they have been cleaned and set up properly.
  • developed a good working relationship with Grace, a member of the beekeeping group who is very keen to see the project thrive and who works for the local council that owns the land on which the main apiary is sited.

UK Department for International Development Awards (DFID) A+

Beekeeping in the Laikipia area of Kenya

A three year BeesAbroad project in Kenya which was funded by DFID funded project has been recognised for it’s significant contribution to the goal of poverty relief in the area. DFID deemed that the outcomes of the project, which had a budget of £246,798 controlled by Bees Abroad, had exceeded expections, were ‘highly relevant’ and ‘incorporated value for money aspects particularly related to economy’.

“the beekeeping based activities provided a level of resilience to extreme weather events that typically impact on livestock and crop production in these areas”.  Ms Judy Amoke, Performance and Risk Manager, DfID

So what did we achieve?

  • Promoted beekeeping activies amoung 1245 pastoral households
  • 971 housholds made hive products for sale
  • 523 households saw incomes rise by more than 15%
  • 11 of the beekeepers’ groups set up attained quality certification from the Kenya Bureau of Standards.
  • 4 co-operatives established with full business plans
  • 15 market outlets formalised
  • More than 450 households reported planting five or more bee-friendly trees or shrubs.

“It is clear … the project had achieved good results, hence worth replication and scaling up. It is our wish to engage partners who work towards value for money and ensure such verifiable results”. ACT! (Act, Transform, Change), the allocating group for DfID money in Kenya

BeesAbroad are very proud of this project and look forward to many more similar successes in the future. Many thanks to Bees Abroad volunteers John and Mary Home who managed the project together with David Evans as project accountant.