INTO Giving – funds beekeeping in Odogbolu district, Nigeria

INTO Giving Funds Bees Abroad’s School Beekeeping Project in Nigeria

INTO Giving is an exemplary charity that supports humanitarian and community projects in the developing world. Charities/projects are nominated by INTO employees who also raise the funds used to support development activities. Each year the charity selects 1-2 new charities/projects for support. Nominations are assessed by the INTO Board, who act as administrators / trustees.

Whether it’s girls’ or refugee education (two of the big and important themes that emerged in 2016), or helping to build or refurbish a school, support teachers, or other educational projects INTO Giving is active in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. With

 

projects in Bangladesh, Ghana, Malawi, Thailand and Lebanon support from INTO Giving improves the lives of disadvantaged and impoverished children and their teachers. In the last year, INTO Giving donated more than £75,000 to education projects in the developing world – TWICE AS MUCH AS IN 2016!

Okun Owa’s Beekeeping trainees

In 2017, 28 projects were nominated by staff for consideration, including Bees Abroad’s Multilateral Grammar School Beekeeping Project. 6 projects were selected for support and we were delighted to learn that the Bees Abroad proposal came out joint top in the assessment process.

Over three years, Bees Abroad will train two beekeeping trainers within the rural government run school. The trainers will establish a school beekeeping club to include beekeeping as a topic in the curriculum, in addition to established agriculture and animal husbandry courses. The teaching apiary with 30 top bar hives will be established in the first year (2018). The project will also train 10 pupils as beekeepers, who will build their own hives (two hives per trainee), make their own bee suits and manage their colonies on their own account. Trainees come from farming families on very low incomes which in turn leads to poor nutrition, high mortality at all ages and inadequate access to healthcare and education.

INTO Giving is funding 100% of the project cost. Funding will cover the cost of delivery of beekeeping training, including training the teachers, materials needed for hive construction and personal protection equipment, provision of instructional training materials and manuals, costs of apiary establishment and harvesting equipment.

From 2020 onwards, the sale of honey and secondary products should provide an income stream for the school beekeeping club to be self-sufficient.

At the school selection day, the need for income generation was evidenced when 85 students from the junior and senior school turned up to bid for ten trainee places!

Some had previous exposure to the craft, for example through honey hunting. All were aged between 14 and 18 years old. They showed great enthusiasm which is important as training will have to fit around school and family responsibilities.

Over 98% of these students contributed financially to their households. Some run their own skilled micro enterprises such as tailoring or carpentry; others have various paid seasonal farm jobs like peeling of cassava. In the longer term, the aims and objectives of the project will go a long way to extending the capacity of trainees to contribute to financial obligations at home.

Typically, good beekeepers are naturally observant and inquisitive. We look for trainees who are aware of the environment and interested in trees, insects and plants. Those who already have some work ethic are more likely to be systematic in checking hives regularly and notice details that provide clues to what is happening in their hives, to their bees and to the local conditions. They are also more likely to be innovative – natural researchers experimenting with their own ideas and testing out ideas they have learnt or new solutions to problems.

The Bees Abroad intervention is not based on handouts – trainees will be required to build or make inputs from scratch as appropriate, from local resources, to they experience the options for differentiating roles and interests within beekeeping. Roles range from carpenters building hives, to tailors making bee suits or specialisations such as producing secondary bee products or providing pollination services, or as has happened with past projects, trainees become beekeeping trainers themselves!

Our focus is to train the students to be active beekeepers and manage their bee hives and not their bees. We emphasise producing more honey from each hive to increase productivity over having more hives to increase production. Our strategy requires better capacity building for the beekeepers and less investment in equipment.

Training is in modern beekeeping management techniques in line with the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) Tropical Syllabus. Bees Abroad will apply sustainable and ecological methods, for example hives and bee suits are made from local materials and there will be an emphasis on pollination, ecology and conservation. Trainees will be provided with Bees Abroad Basic and Advance beekeeping manuals for reference as well as practical hands on training in the field during the local bee season. The theoretical and practical training modules will be delivered by a certified (Nigerian) Bees Abroad trainer locally, whom we have worked with successfully for a number of years.

After training, students will practice beekeeping on their own account in their communities, thus creating a second income which will help to pay their school fees and support their extended families.

 

 

 

 

 

Tribute to David Njuguna

It is with deep regret that we have received the sad news of the recent death of David Njuguna in a road accident. 

David was a wonderful friend and colleague without whose support, commitment, knowledge and enthusiasm we would never have achieved so much for Bees Abroad in Kenya.

David worked in beekeeping development in various African Countries before he approached Bees Abroad, having learnt of the charity’s work through someone in Cameroon. When in Kenya we met with him and realised his enthusiasm for beekeeping,  how this would make a difference to the rural people we were working with, and how similar his approach was to ours. We had a mutual understanding and this bonded us together. That was the joy of working closely with David for the past 10 years; bringing benefits through honey bees and their management to the people he cared so much about In Kenya.

We always appreciated David’s care of us on our visits to Kenya. He was a very special person and we looked on him as part of our extended family in whom we had complete trust. He was an example to all for his energy and dedication and willingness to help anyone who called on him.

David was highly respected by the beekeeping community; so much so that we have received many messages of how greatly David will be missed. We wish to share a few of these:

“David will be greatly missed. He was a rare and very special person, his life has brought his immense skills, hope and opportunities to so many, as well as friendship and kindness to all who knew him”

“We’ll always cherish the contribution he personally made to the beekeeping industry in the country. His legacy will live on. For those still in the service, strive for excellent performance. That is the honour we can bestow to our departed colleague.” 

 David was a well-focused and active member of Apiculture Platform of Kenya and had a wealth of knowledge and experience, particularly on practical beekeeping. His desire to help communities to harness the potential in beekeeping for their livelihoods was exemplary.”

 

His earthly life may have ended, but his contribution to so many who remain is in the memory of all of us.

As a tribute to him I’m sure he would wish us to continue his dream of being Bees Abroad Kenya .

John and Mary Home, David and Roz Evans, September 2017

Social Media and Digital Content

We recognise that our expertise in, and understanding of, the effective use of social media as a route to fundraising is lacking. We are therefore seeking a volunteer to educate us, provide practical help and ongoing coaching. This be could be as a project, a secondment or as a part-time volunteer. We are open to all offers and suggestions. Your contribution will help us increase our online visibility and impact.

In addition, you will learn about the wonders of honey bees and beekeeping; we could even help you become a beekeeper.

Getting in touch….
If this opportunity sounds right for you, please contact me by email or ‘phone: Richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk
t: 07942 815753.

Corporate Sponsorship

We would like to expand our fundraising and communications team to include someone who can focus on gaining support from corporate sponsors. The role will involve identifying organisations likely to be sympathetic to our work and persuading them to support us. Corporate sponsorship is a new area of fundraising for Bees Abroad and one we think has potential to become a significant part of our income.

You will be joining an enthusiastic group of volunteers committed to the success of Bees Abroad. Many of us are beekeepers but it is not a requirement.

Interested? Please email our chairman richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk or phone 01799 218023 to find out more.

Trade Show Manager

 

We would like a show manager to understudy our existing volunteer. We aim to attend ten shows around the country each year to recruit supporters, fundraise and promote Bees Abroad. Shows include the BBKA Annual Convention, the National Honey Show, the Great Yorkshire Show and the South of England Show.

The role of the manager is to:

  • ensure we have volunteers to man our stand
  • manage resources used at shows
  • collect and bank funds
  • liaise with show organisers

You will be joining an enthusiastic group of volunteers committed to the success of Bees Abroad. Many of us are beekeepers but it is not a requirement.

Please email our chairman richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk or phone 01799 218023 to find out more.

Become a Trustee

We are searching for new trustees to strengthen our board and help implement the changes essential to secure our future and implement our strategy.

Our mission is the relief of poverty through beekeeping in any part of the world. Our vision is to be be the Go-To International Leader in building sustainable beekeeping enterprises for those in poverty.

Our team of volunteer beekeepers and local trainers work with selcted groups to establish social entreprises based on beekeeping. The sale of honey typically increases income by 20% and improved pollination increases crop yields.

We are interested in hearing from you whatever your background and expertise.

We don’t specify a time commitment, the more the better! Trustees meet by teleconference on the fourth Monday evening of every month. Our AGM takes place on a Sunday 8th April 2018 at Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire.

The role is entirely voluntary, no remuneration is offered. Trustees have and must accept ultimate responsibility for directing the affairs of the charity, ensuring it is solvent, well run, and delivering the relief of poverty through beekeeping. New trustees without prior experience will be expected to attend a short course on charity trusteeship.

To find out more from visit our website www.beesabroad.org.uk. and read our annual report. To learn more about the role of trustees visit the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-essential-trustee-what-you-need-to-know-cc3

Applicants should submit a brief CV and describe how they might best contribute to our future. You are welcome to contact our chairman before applying, richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk. tel: 01799 218023

It is not a requirement to be a beekeeper but commitment to and enthusiasm for our work are essential.

Volunteer with Us

We are searching for new trustees to strengthen our Board and help implement the changes essential to secure our future and implement or strategy.

Our mission is the relief of poverty through the craft of beekeeping in any part of the world. Our vision is to be be the Go-To International Leader in building sustainable beekeeping enterprises for those in poverty.

Our team of volunteer beekeepers and local trainers work with selcted groups to establish social entreprises based on beekeeping. The sale of honey typically increases income by 20% and improved poliination increases crop yields.

We are interested in hearing from you whatever your background and expertise.

We don’t specify a time commitment, the more the better! Trustees meet by teleconference on the fourth Monday evening of every month. Our AGM takes place on a Sunday in April at Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire.

The role is entirely voluntary, no remuneration is offered. Trustees have and must accept ultimate responsibility for directing the affairs of the charity, ensuring it is solvent, well run, and delivering the relief of poverty through beekeeping. New trustees without prior experience will be expected to attend a short course on charity trusteeship.

To learn more about the role of a trustee visit the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-essential-trustee-what-you-need-to-know-cc3

Applicants should submit a brief CV and describe how they might best contribute to our future. You are welcome to contact our chairman before applying, richard_ridler@beesabroad.org.uk 01799 218023

It is not a requirement to be a beekeeper but commitment to and enthusiasm for our work are essential.

 

Rory’s Well – Bee Farming

We are delighted to announce that we have launched a project in partnerhsip with Rory’s Well to support Bee Farming in the Barri Chiefdom, Pujehun District, SW Sierra Leone.

Neil Brent a member of Gloucestershire Beekeepers and Kath Hayward visited Sierra Leone earlier this year in order to assess potential for bee farming in the area. Five villages were visited: Korigboma, Mano, Makka, Semabu, and Taninahun meeting with the chief and meet villagers who wanted to farm bees and discuss the project with them. From the start it was clear that there was a lot of interest in all the villages. These visits also involved walking to places where there were known to be wild bees. The individuals who came forward were mostly ‘honey-hunters’ who find wild bees and then take their honey; in the process this can mean that colonies are destroyed. Bee Farming aims to maintain hives of bees for longer periods. Whilst these site visits were happening a carpenter and two local apprentices were busy making seven hives for siting close to each of the five villages.

Brian Durk will support Neil as he learns more about beekeeping in Africa and will help Neil to deliver training in this remote and challenging part of Africa.

http://www.roryswell.org/bee-farming.html

Good to the last drop – Bees in India

Martin Kunz has recently visited India. Here is a fascinating article about beekeeping there, the different species of bee and how the honey crop is improving livelihoods. The article is written by his wife Marianne Landzettel, with photos taken by Martin.

<b>Reprint courtesy of Oregon Tilth’s </b><b><i>In Good Tilth</i></b><b> magazine, Spring Issue 2017</b>

<a href=”https://igt.tilth.org/good-to-the-last-drop/”>https://igt.tilth.org/good-to-the-last-drop/</a>