Latest from our Project Managers – see also our Latest News page

Richard & Jane Ridler visit Uganda

On arrival in Uganda, we met Shaun from http://www.beeutifulcreations.org, a social enterprise working with local beekeepers to make and sell a fabulous range of value added products. We were given honey with our winter tea and bees appeared immediately! On Friday we travelled North from Kigali to Kasese. Just outside Kasese we crossed the equator and passed ahead of elephants. Daniel, Grace and their family were thrilled to see us again and the football was a big hit. We are very fortunate to have these wonderful folks leading our work at LIDEFO. We took our trainee project manager Venetia to see a model apiary and then to visit the honey collection and processing centres.  Despite severe drought last year, since our visit to LIDEFO in 2014, great progress has been made. The team are making 100 hives for a local land owner who they will also train. A good example of a group developing its own income after our initial support has ended. Below is a photo of Grace's Shop and the LIDEFO Honey Purchasing Centre. We shared ideas about new ways to deliver projects. We agreed to experiment with recording key data, asking chosen families to record our impact on their life style and linking further project stages to success in earlier stages. We explored ideas for making honey based sweets, bee tourism and maintaining the loyalty of new beekeepers to LIDEFO. This photo shows where beekeepers in the area take their honey. Once LIDEFO have purchased the honey, they process pack and sell it to retailers. On Sunday we travelled to Ibanda Parish to audit our Noah's widows project. First we joined the morning church service and I was unexpectedly asked to address the congregation. Various senior church officials had come especially to meet us. They thanked us ...
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INTO Giving – funds beekeeping in Odogbolu district, Nigeria

INTO Giving Funds Bees Abroad’s School Beekeeping Project in Nigeria INTO Giving is an exemplary charity that supports humanitarian and community projects in the developing world. Charities/projects are nominated by INTO employees who also raise the funds used to support development activities. Each year the charity selects 1-2 new charities/projects for support. Nominations are assessed by the INTO Board, who act as administrators / trustees. Whether it’s girls’ or refugee education (two of the big and important themes that emerged in 2016), or helping to build or refurbish a school, support teachers, or other educational projects INTO Giving is active in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. With projects in Bangladesh, Ghana, Malawi, Thailand and Lebanon support from INTO Giving improves the lives of disadvantaged and impoverished children and their teachers. In the last year, INTO Giving donated more than £75,000 to education projects in the developing world – TWICE AS MUCH AS IN 2016! In 2017, 28 projects were nominated by staff for consideration, including Bees Abroad’s Multilateral Grammar School Beekeeping Project. 6 projects were selected for support and we were delighted to learn that the Bees Abroad proposal came out joint top in the assessment process. Over three years, Bees Abroad will train two beekeeping trainers within the rural government run school. The trainers will establish a school beekeeping club to include beekeeping as a topic in the curriculum, in addition to established agriculture and animal husbandry courses. The teaching apiary with 30 top bar hives will be established in the first year (2018). The project will also train 10 pupils as beekeepers, who will build their own hives (two hives per trainee), make their own bee suits and manage their colonies on their own account. Trainees come from farming families on very low incomes which in turn leads ...
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United Nations funds beekeeping in Nigeria

The United Nations Staff 1% Development Fund has awarded a grant to a new beekeeping training centre at Zamfarawa in NW Nigeria. The UN 1% fund identifies community projects in developing countries with potential to become self-sustaining and keeps in touch with local contacts who supervise and monitor the development initiatives. The new Beekeeping Extension Resource Centre will be an education centre for rural communities, school children, and students of Ahmadu Bello University and the Samaru College of Agriculture. There will be a range of literature and other information on beekeeping available, examples of hives, protective clothing and extraction equipment, and a projector and screen for presentations. 120 local community members, 60% of whom are women, have already registered their interest. The Beekeeping Extension Society (BES) have managed and run a number of projects funded and supported by BeesAbroad. The existing capacity of the group, and the involvement of Idris Muhammad Barua, BES’ Project Director (and previous BeesAbroad trainer for projects in Cameroon and Liberia) was pivotal to securing UN funding as it proved that the funds would have long-term, sustainable outcomes. BeesAbroad are very proud that our current and previous projects have contributed to this exciting step forward for beekeeping education for Nigeria ...
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Visit to Kenya by Abdul Miah

When the chance arose to travel to Kenya and document the DIFD funded Bees abroad project, it was an opportunity too good to turn down. Landing in Nairobi on my birthday and leaving a young family behind in London, I wanted to maximise this opportunity to reflect to the best of my ability the impact beekeeping has on the lives of people benefiting from the Bees Abroad project in Kenya. I was collected by the Executive project manager David Njuguna and our driver Jessie Maina and was taken to Nanyuki to the project headquarters. David is a very knowledgeable beekeeper and I was quickly acquainted to the cultural differences in bee keeping together with the social customs in Kenya (lots of praying at every opportunity). During my short stay we visited 7 groups and two schools, with most days starting early and finishing late, with hours spent on very dusty and often bumpy roads. Our first stop was visiting a honey processing unit in Ruai. The centre had been refurbished with the support of Bees Abroad after being closed for many years. The centre was originally opened in 1978 by the Canadian High commission but eventually closed down as interest and knowledge about bees declined in the local area. Since 2012, with the support of Bees Abroad, the centre which contains a honey refinery, a small meeting space and a couple of storage rooms has rejuvenated the beekeeping community in the area with up to 200 bee keepers benefiting from the centre. Group Chairman Josphet Kiriungi, declared his group have benefited greatly from the work of Bees Abroad as they received training in beekeeping and capacity building. The Ruai group have also been working closely with Bees Abroad’s Nanyuki based marketing officers. Mary Ngari - Bees Abroad Marketing Officer in ...
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From Uganda

Stuart Andrews and Roy Dyche will be visiting our project in Hoima, Uganda at the end of April, and you will be able to follow their work via Stuart's photographic blog.  Bookmark the page! Stuart's blog from Hoima Below is a link to a previous report from this exciting project helping women’s groups living in a rural area of West Uganda. Hoima 2013 ...
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Project Manager in Uganda

Dave Bonner has recently been visiting our project in Mbale.  He kept a blog to record activities whilst he was in-country.   Please follow the link to read his story - and admire his practical construction classes. Uganda Blog ...
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Blog from Kenya

John and Mary Home returned recently from projects in Kenya to relieve poverty through beekeeping. Whilst they were there, they kept a blog diary of their experiences.  Please click here to read more ...
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Blog from Cameroon

Read Jo Hiscox's blog to get a fascinating insight into how our project leaders support beekeepers, and see the impact beekeeping can make to low-income families.  Jo, Brian Durk and Gill Johnson spent 2 months working on various projects in rural Cameroon.   Follow this link to Jo's Blog ...
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